Quantcast
<em>Journal</em>

Good I Will Be

The four-time AQHA world champion was euthanized on November 10.

By Tara Matsler
The American Quarter Horse Journal
November 11, 2013

Good I Will Be placed third in senior western riding at the 2012 AQHA world Championship Show with Leonard Berryhill in the saddle

Good I Will Be placed third in senior western riding at the 2012 AQHA world Championship Show with Leonard Lee Berryhill in the saddle. (Journal photo)

One of the industry’s leading performance halter stallions, Good I Will Be, was euthanized on Sunday. 

According to Good I Will Be’s Facebook page, the stallion underwent surgery for a kidney stone at Texas A&M University Veterinary Hospital in College Station, Texas. The stallion did not recover well from surgery and was humanely euthanized on November 10. 

“The horse industry lost one of the great ones. And we lost one of our family,” wrote owner Sandra Morgan of Langley, British Columbia. “Words cannot express the sorry we feel. But we are grateful for the amazing team of veterinarians in Weatherford, Texas, and at Texas A&M University that did all that was humanely possible for him.”

The 2004 bay stallion was by A Good Machine and out of Miss Trophy Dash by Hotrodders Jet Set. Bred by Gerald Speeks of Midlothian, Virginia, “Willy’s” winning ways knew no boundaries. The stallion boasted four AQHA performance halter world titles, earned in the amateur and Select amateur divisions, as well as a reserve world title in open performance halter stallions. 

But it wasn’t just in the halter pen that the bay stallion shone. Willy racked up countless accolades in western pleasure, hunter under saddle, horsemanship and western riding during his career. In National Snaffle Bit Association and AQHA World Championship Show earnings, Willy had collected more than $64,100. 

As a sire, Good I Will Be is already making his mark. His 40 point earners have earned 1,841.5 points and more than $60,600 in NSBA earnings. Good I Will Be was standing at Stephen Stephens’ Dry River Ranch in Weatherford, Texas. 

“Willy was an amazingly stoic animal,” Sandra added. “(He) was a true champion to the end."