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The Rundown: News Roundup

From American Quarter Horses on TV, to cow horse practice works, a recently crowned $3 million PRCA money earner and new FEI reining rules -- The Rundown has got you covered.

By Tara Christiansen
The American Quarter Horse Journal
August 2, 2011

Samantha Bayer and Nic It Good circle up at cow

Samantha Bayer and Nic It Good, the 2010 Ford Youth World working cow horse world champions, circle up a cow. Journal photo.

AQHA on TV

Get ready to set your digital recorders for American Quarter Horses on RFD-TV this fall.

All of the rip-roarin’ excitement from the 2011 Battle in the Saddle will air on RFD-TV on September 15 at 10 p.m. EST.

Catch the highlights from the 2011 Adequan Select World Championship Show on October 6 at 10 p.m. EST and Project Cowboy on October 10 at 7:30 p.m. EST.

Cow Work Practice

Last year, AQHA Judge Sam Rose and AQHA Professional Horseman Todd Crawford hosted a cow work practice for working cow horse competitors at the Built Ford Tough AQHYA World Championship Show.

Based on the success of last year’s event, they’re hosting another practice this year.

"Last year, I think we had all the (working cow horse) competitors entered in the (Ford Youth World) come," says Sam. "We held a mini seminar and safety work, and we were in the arena with the kids the whole time."

This year, the cow work practice will be held at 4c Equine, owned by Cary Cushing. The ranch is located at 7108 East Tyler Drive in Tuttle, Oklahoma. The practice is scheduled to begin at 7 a.m. on August 10. The working order will be the same as the draws at the Ford Youth World, and cattle will be supplied by Todd Crawford.

"We're very happy to do this event," Sam says. "It's something Todd and I can do to help the kids. It's something we've been doing all our lives and something that's really helpful to the kids."

Cow work practice flyers can be found in Ford Youth World entry form packets and around State Fair Park in Oklahoma City during the show. For more information, contact Sam Rose at (940) 365-3252 or Todd Crawford at (805) 693-5414.

Match Roping Champ 

Back-to-back Battle in the Saddle Match Roping Champion, Fred Whitfield, recently became the third man to surpass $3 million in career earnings in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. Only Trevor Brazile and Billy Etbauer had previously achieved this milestone.

The Hockley, Texas, cowboy surpassed the mark after finishing second in the first round at the 115th edition of the Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo with a time of 11.2 seconds, collecting $6,088 for his efforts.

Fred’s weekend earnings added up to $12,104 and a jump from outside the top 50 in the world standings to 34th. Fred is looking for his 20th trip to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, which takes the top 15 cowboys in their respective event standings.

FEI Reining Rules

The Federation Equestre Internationale Reining Committee completed its work on a total revision of the rules structure for the discipline. The proposed amendments will be sent to National Federations for full consultation before they are voted on in November at the FEI General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, prior to implementation on January 1, 2012.

The new rules will cover training and warm-up methods used at FEI events for sliding stops, spins and backing. Also included in the revisions are new rules covering:

  • Types of bits allowed
  • Types of spurs allowed
  • Education of officials
  • Minimum number of stewards required at events

Separately, the FEI inquiry into allegations that breaches of its rules and regulations occurred during training sessions at the FEI World Reining Final on May 20 in Bökebergs Gård, Sweden, has been completed.

The inquiry was based on detailed reports received from FEI officials on duty at the event, as well as interviews with key individuals.

No yellow cards were issued at the event, but Eric Straus, the chief steward of the event, has since informed the FEI that verbal warnings were given to a number of riders in Bökebergs Gård.

The inquiry has established that verbal warnings were issued for a variety of reasons, including riding for too long, running a horse into the wall, overly aggressive use of the hands, overly aggressive use of the spurs and attempting to train post-competition. However, due to the lack of authenticated evidence such as original unedited video footage, no further action can be taken against any individuals.

Findings from the inquiry have been incorporated into the overall review of the discipline and have played a key role in finalizing the proposed new rules on training and warm-up methods, as well revisions to the FEI’s stewarding policy on enforcement of the FEI rules and regulations.