Showing

Exporting Issues Part 1

Horses need travel agents, vaccinations and blood tests before heading overseas.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

Note: this article is meant to create awareness of issues surrounding exporting horses from the United States. If you plan to export a horse from the United States, please visit with your local Animal and Plant Health Inspector Service’s area vet in charge for the latest regulations regarding export.

Many of these numbers represent horses shipped across borders for international competitions, but sales denote the majority. As American Quarter Horse disciplines such as reining and cutting expand internationally, trade will follow, and sales are likely to rise. And with the 2010 Alltech World Equestrian Games just days away, horses have already started arriving from across the globe. But how does it work? What are the steps needed to ship a horse overseas or across international borders? What does it cost?

Equine Travel Agent
Unless you’re familiar with international laws and taxes, customs, foreign languages and animal disease, exporting a horse can be a nightmare. That’s why Camia Lane, agriculture marketing specialist for the United States Department of Agriculture, recommends working with an agent and a freight forwarder. Lane oversees transportation in all U.S. agriculture areas, and she notes that livestock take extra care to send across any border.

Slide into the excitement of reining with AQHA's "Reining Basics with Craig Johnson" DVD. Whether you are a beginning horse enthusiast learning to ride or an accomplished rider polishing a performance reining horse for competition, this DVD is a valuable addition to any horseman’s DVD library.

“It can be tricky, especially if you are a first-time exporter,” Camia says. “Regulations are changing all the time, embargoes might be in place you’re unaware of, and there are critical forms to be filled out before the animal can be exported.”

Pauls Valley, Oklahoma, resident Irmgaard Geul is an equine freight forwarder, or as she puts it, “a travel agent for horses.” In 1994, Irmgaard relocated to Oklahoma from Holland, where she and a partner ran an equine import/export quarantine facility. Her experience in the industry, coupled with her multicultural connections, make the process as simple as possible.

“I noticed that quarantine was not as good in many places,” she says. “The horses were too skinny, and a lot of people had problems shipping horses.”

Slide into the excitement of reining with AQHA's "Reining Basics with Craig Johnson" DVD. Whether you are a beginning horse enthusiast learning to ride or an accomplished rider polishing a performance reining horse for competition, this DVD is a valuable addition to any horseman’s DVD library.

Her solution was a one-stop station that specializes in horses. Her 120-acre facility, named Nedpoint Quarter Horses, provides a worry-free solution for horse owners unfamiliar with international export and import regulations. She accepts horses for import and export. Most of her business is conducted between the United States and European countries.

Roll It!

In celebration of the upcoming Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games, here’s a ringside seat for the reining clinic hosted by renowned horsemen Casey Hinton and Shawn Flarida (who just happens to be a member of Team USA competing in reining!) at the 2010 Youth World Cup.

For an average of $3,600, Irmgaard will accept your horse for quarantine at her station for 30 days and implement all normal vaccinations and critical paperwork. The fee also includes a new halter and lead rope, daily care, feed and hay, transportation to the airport, an airline ticket to select destinations in Europe, paperwork preparation for arrival and a connection with a designated agent to accept the horse in the new country. Typical quarantine for importing into most European countries is 30 days.

As the seller, if the horse you sold is a high-end animal, $3,600 might be a nominal fee that’s well worth the service. Irmgaard, however, thinks the buyer should be responsible for this, in most cases.

If the seller can build it onto the cost of the horse, that is a good idea,” she says. “I encourage people to have the buyer pay the cost of quarantine.”

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article, coming up next week!

Don't miss out on the 3rd annual Breast Cancer Benefit and Reining Futurity/Derby from September 29th to October 3rd. The event, sponsored by the West Coast Reining Horse Association, features AQHA classes, and is at the Murrieta Equestrian Center, in Sacramento, California.